What I See in Lincoln’s Eyes Practice, English homework help

1- Obama spends a lot of “What I See in Lincoln’s Eyes” making comparisons between himself and President Lincoln. In what passage does Obama actually offer a contrast?


A

A connected idea attracts us to Lincoln: As we remake ourselves, we remake our surroundings. He didn’t just talk or write or theorize.

B

In Lincoln’s rise from poverty, his ultimate mastery of language and law, his capacity to overcome personal loss and remain determined in the face of repeated defeat––in all this, he reminded me not just of my own struggles.

As a law professor and civil rights lawyer and as an African American, I am fully aware of his limited views on race. Anyone who actually reads the Emancipation Proclamation knows it was more a military document than a clarion call for justice.

D

So when I, an African American man with a funny name, born in Hawaii of a father from Kenya and a mother from Kansas, announced my candidacy for the United States Senate, it was hard to imagine a less likely scenario than that I would win—except, perhaps, for the one that allowed a child born in the backwoods of Kentucky with less than a year of formal education to end up as Illinois’ greatest citizen and our nation’s greatest President.

2- In which passage is Obama most clearly making a comparison?


The only way for Lincoln to get onto the podium was to squeeze his lanky frame through a window, whereupon he reportedly remarked, “At last I have finally gone through college.”

In the midst of slavery’s dark storm and the complexities of governing a house divided, he somehow kept his moral compass pointed firm and true.

C

The smile doesn’t negate the sorrow. But it alters tragedy into grace.

D

What is it about this man that can move us so profoundly? Some of it has to do with Lincoln’s humble beginnings, which often speak to our own.

3- What type of essay structure best describes how Obama organized the essay “What I See in Lincoln’s Eyes”?


A

Chronological

B

Instructional

C

Comparison/Contrast

D

Inverted pyramid: Most important ideas followed by least important ideas

4-In which of these passages is Obama interpreting, or taking meaning from, an image?


A

As a law professor and civil rights lawyer and as an African American, I am fully aware of his limited views on race. Anyone who actually reads the Emancipation Proclamation knows it was more a military document than a clarion call for justice.

B

He appears frail, almost broken; his eyes, averted from the camera’s lens, seem to contain a heartbreaking melancholy, as if he sees before him what the nation had so recently endured.

C

Humor, ambiguity, complexity, compassion—all were part of his character.

D

In his sheer energy, Lincoln captures a hunger in us to build and to innovate. It’s a quality that can get us in trouble; we may be blind at times to the costs of progress.

5- In which of these passages is Obama presenting an image?


A

In it, Lincoln’s face is as finely lined as a pressed flower.

B

What is it about this man that can move us so profoundly? Some of it has to do withLincoln’s humble beginnings, which often speak to our own.

During my first six years in the state legislature, Democrats were in the minority, and Icouldn’t get a bill heard, much less passed.

In his sheer energy, Lincoln captures a hunger in us to build and to innovate. It’s a qualitythat can get us in trouble; we may be blind at times to the costs of progress.

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